SBL Nida Lectures

Since 2007, the Nida Institute has recruited and sponsored highly recognized scholars in translation studies and its cognate disciplines to present informative and engaging lectures at the annual and international meetings of the Society of Biblical Literature (SBL). These sessions are widely publicized within SBL and attract a diverse audience.

This venue promotes the Institute’s transdisciplinary approach to translation, while providing biblical scholars an opportunity to challenge and augment their traditional understanding of the theory and practice of translation. A list of past lecturers demonstrates the Institute’s commitment to exposing SBL’s membership to top-ranking innovative thinkers working in fields relevant to translation studies. 

 

2013

Annual Meeting – Timothy Beal, Tracing the Other in Translation: Levinas, Alterity, and the Task of the Biblical Translator

International Meeting – Simon Crisp, Texts, Pretexts, Contexts and Paratexts: How Translation Studies Might Shed Light on Biblical Text Criticism

2012

Annual Meeting – Mark L. Strauss, The Relative Merits of Foreignness and Domestication in Contemporary Bible Translation

International Meeting – Lourens de Vries, The Romantic Turn in Bible Translation

2011

International Meeting - Valerie Henitiuk, The Bones of the Stuff: Translation and World Literature

Annual Meeting - Edwin Gentzler, The Power Turn in Translation Studies

2010

International Meeting - Siri Nergaard, Semiotics and Translation

Annual Meeting - Vicente Rafael, The Babel of Monolingualism: Translation, American English and Empire 


2009

International Meeting - Christiane Nord, Intertextuality in Early Christian Literature and Translation

Annual Meeting - Maria Tymoczko, Translating the Bible in Circumstances of Asymmetrical Power: The Openness of Texts and the Self-Determination of the Reader

2008

Annual Meeting - Larry Venuti, Genealogies of Translation Theory

2007

Annual Meeting - Anthony Pym, Bible Translation and Philosophy of Dialogue: Making the Text Speak to the Future